Archives for CFOI

Robust approach to FOI time limits stalled by pandemic

For some time, the Campaign has been calling on the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) to use its power to issue enforcement notices against authorities which repeatedly breach the Freedom of Information Act’s time limits.[1] An enforcement notice could require an authority to reply to all outstanding FOI requests by a specified deadline – unlike a decision notice, which can only deal with an individual request. The ICO has only issued 4 enforcement notices since the FOI Act came into force in 2005 and only 2 of these relate to compliance with time limits.[2]

Now, in response to an FOI request, the ICO has revealed that before the pandemic, it was moving towards using enforcement notices in this way – a welcome development.[3]

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Deferring decision notices

The Information Commissioner’s Office appears to be delaying the issue of decision notices in at least some FOI cases. The aim is to reduce new appeals to the tribunal and the burden on public authorities who would have to respond to them.

The Information Commissioner’s Office has written to a requester saying that his complaint has not been upheld, adding:

“the Commissioner proposes to close this case informally. Should you wish to challenge this decision at the First Tier Tribunal, please let me know and a decision notice will be prepared.

Please note, however, that in order to not place undue burden on public authorities and the Tribunal during the Covid-19 pandemic, the Commissioner will not issue this decision notice immediately and will wait until such time she considers appropriate.”

This case related to an FOI request for the Intelligence and Security Committee’s (ISC) report on possible Russian interference in the 2016 Brexit referendum. The Cabinet Office had initially refused it on the grounds that the report was due to be published in future and was therefore exempt under section 22 of FOIA. In fact, the government is only committed to publishing a redacted version of the report which means that the redacted passages could not be withheld under this exemption. During the ICO investigation the Cabinet Office applied section 23 of the Act to the whole report. This is an absolute exemption applying to information relating to or supplied by specified security bodies, including the ISC.

At the date of writing the ICO had published 34 decision notices on its web site dated between 1 and 17 April 2020, nearly all of which could lead to tribunal appeals. All have been issued since the ICO’s new policy of not penalising authorities for failing to meet FOI deadlines during the pandemic. It’s not clear whether the delaying of the above decision notice represents a new approach which will apply to all decisions for the time being or whether it is being applied in selected cases only, and if so on what basis – and whether it will apply to potentially urgent requests relating to the pandemic itself.

If it is necessary to protect authorities from FOI appeals so as not to divert them from responding to the pandemic, this should be done by the tribunal which has already deferred all existing FOI appeals by two months. The tribunal can also can extend the time limits for individual cases if asked to. It should not be necessary for the ICO to withhold decision notices from the public.

[Note: This piece was amended shortly after initial publication on 29 April 2020 by adding the final paragraph]

ICO approach to FOI delays during COVID-19

In an article published on the 6th April we discussed the Information Commissioner’s announcement that it would not penalise public authorities for failing to meet FOI deadlines during the coronavirus pandemic.

The ICO’s response to a complaint submitted on 6 March 2020 provides an insight into how it is dealing with complaints about delay during the crisis.
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FOI and the pandemic

Contains public sector information licensed under the Open Government Licence v3.0.

The coronavirus pandemic has prompted calls for the FOI Act to be relaxed and led some public authorities to announce that they will stop answering FOI requests. However, pressure for FOI time limits to be formally extended has been averted, probably by the Information Commissioner’s Office’s announcement that it will not penalise public authorities for failing to meet deadlines during the crisis. Deadlines under Scotland’s FOI Act, by contrast, have been substantially relaxed.
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Restrictions on the disclosure of information in Environment Bill

The Campaign has produced a briefing for MPs for the second reading of the Environment Bill in the House of Commons on 26th February 2020.

We are concerned at the restrictions on disclosure of information in the bill:

  • The bill establishes the Office for Environmental Protection (OEP) but contains broad prohibitions on the disclosure of information about some of the OEP’s functions. The Explanatory Notes say these prohibitions do not affect the public’s right to information under the Environmental Information Regulations (EIR) except in one specified way. However, nothing in the bill itself establishes that the prohibitions do not override the EIR right to information. The bill should be amended to ensure that the EIR right of access is not undermined.
  • The bill would prohibit disclosure of information about OEP investigations into suspected failures by public authorities to comply with environmental law. The prohibition would only be lifted once the OEP decides to take no further action. However, the status of the information in question would be changed to allow a particular EIR exception that might not otherwise apply to be invoked. This would make it more likely that the information could be withheld under the EIR. That should not be necessary. Existing EIR exceptions protect information whose disclosure is shown to be harmful and not in the public interest.
  • A prohibition would also apply to information which public bodies supply to the OEP to assist it with its functions. The information could only be disclosed with the consent of the body supplying it. If the prohibition on disclosure trumps the EIR right of access, this information could be withheld indefinitely, preventing public access to information about matters such as progress toward meeting environmental targets.

Read the full briefing.

Using the FOI Act training, 27 February 2020

Photograph: Samuel Zeller

When: Thursday 27th February 2020
Where: Free Word Centre, 60 Farringdon Road, London EC1R 3GA
Time: Registration 9:45 am, course 10 am – 4:30 pm

Do you want to learn how to use the Freedom of Information Act? Are you already using the Act, but want to know more about how key provisions are being interpreted?

Making a FOI request is straightforward but making an effective request can be more difficult. Requests that ask for too much information can be refused – and some information may be exempt. But a well thought-out request can have a powerful impact, revealing that a policy isn’t working, an authority isn’t doing its job or generating key information for your research.

The course is designed to help campaigners, researchers, journalists and others make the most of the Act and the parallel Environmental Information Regulations. It explains the legislation, shows how to draft clear and effective requests and describes how to challenge unjustified refusals. The course’s interactive sessions will encourage you to test your own FOI drafting skills. The course is aimed at both beginners and those who are already using the Act but want to do so more effectively.
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Government retreat on Environment Bill secrecy

Following our campaign on the issue, the government has largely dropped a proposed prohibition on disclosure in the Environment Bill.

Under the bill, a new body called the Office of Environmental Protection (OEP) would investigate serious failures by public bodies to comply with environmental law. But, worryingly, the draft bill had proposed to prohibit public access to most information about the OEP’s investigations, apparently overriding the right of access under the Environmental Information Regulations (EIR).

The Campaign was the first organisation to identify this problem. After highlighting it we co-ordinated a joint letter to the Environment Secretary signed by nearly 40 national organisations objecting to the prohibition. In reply a DEFRA minister claimed that they had not intended override the right of access. Following feedback from stakeholders and “recognising the concerns you have raised in your letter” DEFRA had “worked to address this in the final Bill”.
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Briefing on secrecy in the Health Service Safety Investigations Bill

The Campaign for Freedom has produced a briefing for second reading of the Health Service Safety Investigations Bill in the House of Lords on 29th October 2019.

We are concerned about a prohibition on the disclosure of information contained in the Bill. Under the bill, the Health Service Safety Investigations Body (HSSIB) would investigate selected NHS patient safety accidents or incidents and publish a report on each investigation. But it would be prohibited from making public any other information held in connection with its functions, except in limited circumstances. The prohibition would remove the right of access under the Freedom of Information Act and the right of individuals to see their own personal data under data protection legislation. Moreover, disclosure of protected information, other than in limited circumstances, would be an offence.

The prohibition is said to be necessary:

‘to create a ‘safe space’ within which participants can provide information for the purposes of an investigation in confidence and therefore feel able to speak openly and candidly with the HSSIB.’

If the purpose was to provide a safe space for participants it might be thought that what would be protected would be information likely to identify such a person, whether by name or position or indirectly from the content of what was said. In fact the prohibition on disclosure is not limited in this way.

It applies to any information held ‘in connection with’ the HSSIB’s function that is not already published, whether or not it relates to an identifiable individual, whether or not it relates to an identifiable investigation and whether or not it is capable of deterring participants from speaking frankly to investigators, inhibiting investigators in reaching their conclusions or causing any other adverse effect at all.

We think it is disproportionate and – given the substantial protection for sensitive information in the Freedom of Information (FOI) Act – unnecessary.

Read the full briefing.

Government urged to drop post-Brexit prohibition on environmental disclosure

40 leading environmental, open government and other organisations have signed a letter, which the Campaign for Freedom of Information co-ordinated, urging the government to drop a secrecy provision from draft legislation to improve environmental protection after Brexit. The organisations say the prohibition on disclosure “is wholly at odds with the public’s right to information” under existing UK legislation.
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The Campaign is looking for research volunteers

The Campaign for Freedom of Information is looking for voluntary help with online research on FOI. We need research help to support our campaigns to:

  • extend the FOI Act to contractors and housing associations and other bodies
  • improve the FOI performance information published by public authorities in London

There may be other issues as well.

You would be making a significant contribution to improving the effectiveness of the FOI Act. The Campaign is a very small organisation, whose work has had a proven impact – and your help could make a real difference.

We are looking for volunteers who can help for at least a couple of days a week for a month, or longer. You would mainly be working from home with support from the Campaign’s staff, with some meetings in our office in Farringdon, London to discuss progress. We will cover your expenses.

If you would like to apply, please send your CV with a covering email describing your availability and any relevant experience to admin@cfoi.org.uk.